Archive for the ‘ux for content’ Category

Shiv Singh is one of the foremost experts on Social Media – both B2B and B2C. His bio lists his numerous presentations SXSWi, Web 2.0 (New York), the Direct Marketing Association’s Leader’s Forum, OMMA Global, O’Reilly Graphing Social Patterns, the ARF Annual Summit and Digiday Social. He is often interviewed by Wall Street Journal, Reuters, Associated Press, Ad Age, and Adweek for his views on digital strategy and social influence marketing.

I highly recommend his book, “Social Media Marketing for Dummies” to anyone with even a passing interest in this growing market.

Below is a slideshare presentation given at the Digital Book World Conference in January of this year. Watch, and enjoy.

Here’s a great presentation by Sally Hogshead about the seven “fascination” triggers (or “buy mechanisms”). This Slideshare precedes Sally’s book “Fascinate” due to be released next month – sure to be another hit

This is definitely worth bookmarking and checking out. Also, check out Sally’s website. Great info.

One early morning this week I stopped by my local office supply store (a store that rhymes with shtaples) to pick up a few needed items for my current to-do list.

I noticed a young-ish couple at the end of an aisle with puzzled looks on their faces, pressing the corners of a video screen mounted above what seemed to be, from a distance, a printer display. I edged closer, intrigued by their confusion. Now, I’m not one who normally enjoys office supply store voyeurism, but my interest is always piqued when I see interactive in store advertising. So of course, I had to watch.

Once they walked away bewildered (and not purchasing said product) I headed over to check out the display myself. Sure enough, it had the appearance of an interactive kiosk. However, it was NOT an interactive kiosk. Just a video display. Icons on each corner of the screen gave the impression that one could go “home”, “print”, “go forward” or “go backward”. Pressing on the “buttons” did nothing. Except make that couple very confused. And embarrassed.

See a video of the kiosk here.

What supported this assumption of interactivity? Perhaps the fact that this advertising was for HP’s new web printer – where you can print directly from the web without being connected to a computer in any way. Why wouldn’t such a high tech product be supported by an interactive kiosk? Had I not watched the couple before me be fooled by the usability (or lack thereof), I probably would have reacted the same way my first time at the kiosk.

Most customers don’t like to feel fooled, or feel LIKE fools. I know I don’t. I can guarantee I will not have a second go at any experience that leaves me feeling negative. So if you are going to create advertising that even remotely has the appearance of being interactive, you better make sure that it is. Otherwise, provide content in the form of print support so that customers know that the kiosk is a video only display. In this day and age, people have come to expect a rock solid ad campaign for high tech products (thanks a LOT, Apple) so you either need to give the customers what they want, or quit trying to fake them out.

What’s the lesson? If it’s going to look like a duck, and sound like a duck, make sure it’s a duck. Otherwise the brand just might get goosed.

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Interactive kiosks are becoming more and more common these days, drawing in users with interactivity. Here’s an example of an interactive kiosk display that works well:

Kudos to Ribbit Mobile for figuring out why their Ribbit instructions on the website wouldn’t work for the Blackberry.  For those of you experiencing the same thing, all you need to do is enter *712064531140 and press SEND/CALL on your Blackberry. Then log back into Ribbit Mobile to complete registration.

Then you can use their service. I’ve been using it for several days now, allowing calls to go through to VM and getting the texts sent to me. Their voice recognition software is only as good as the voice mail that is left. But never fear, you can still hear the original voicemail either by calling the new VM number they give you or listening to it directly from the web interface.  I still stand by my original post – Ribbit needs to work the bugs out of the user interface, but they still get two thumbs up for figuring out the problem and sending me directions for resolution.